‘My God’ – Not Yours!

I’ve said this before, but Saturday’s are really full of ‘bustle’. Everybody seems glad to have a couple of day’s off work; and they sure make the best of it! The streets are crammed; and the shops as well, so I usually forget those unless I really have to go into them.

Somebody asked me earlier why I don’t try writing about more serious stuff. But I have been; maybe they had just not been reading it! I am only really trying to write about everyday life here: after all; I didn’t promise any elaborate essays on esotericism or philosophy. My gosh!  I seem to have been ‘attacked’ enough already for merely referring to religion, for example, the people just not realising that I am not referring to themselves personally, but to EVERYONE (yes, and that includes myself).

I think the problem is, that some people actually deny others the right to love God – or be loved by God. But they seem to forget that everyone are God’s children and have every right to worship Infinite Principle (or ‘God’ if you prefer) in anyway they wish.

It is only that Divine Principle that can ‘judge’ me at the end of the day, just as it will also judge others. The point is, people may well be capable of fooling themselves, but people are never capable of fooling That. For NOBODY has exclusive rights on God, and if they think they do, they are only deluding themselves. After all, how could anyone? That Divine Love put us all here in the first place, and surely only He has the Divine Right to bestow love upon His children

When you sometimes hear things like . . . “God doesn’t love you, but he loves ME”, is rather like being back in the kindergarten at school, and hearing some spoilt child throw a tantrum because he or she might think you’ve taken one of their toys! God is love, surely. Its not for mere human to dictate as to who He can or can’t love!

But there are actually some people around who do just that you know; even when they are adults. (Well in body anyway!). “I am ‘saved’, and I have the right to choose whose damned!”. That is really childish. It is almost sick. But one thing is for sure, it does not come from God!

Don’t get me wrong, In general Churches are made up of good and well meaning people. The very fact that people go to them should show you this. But God exists outside of Churches as well. And I am sure He is aware of some of the evil – the lies and the deceit – that take place outside of them.

As an author, I have been writing about this subject since around 1982. I have never said anything other than this, and my writings can give testimony to this fact. So please do not worry about my soul anyone; I entrusted that to God a long time ago!

Well, what else can I really say, when the day has really been quite boring!

Little nervous about tomorrow, but just see how that goes. Life can seem a little mundane sometimes – but something always seems to come along!

We will see!

David

  • reply Hesselius ,

    David hi,

    I wonder, as somebody who has been involved with the Occult for quite a long time, going back to at least the mid 60s, whether you’d agree that in some ways these days it’s somehow lost it’s flavour, become too much assimilated into the mainstream and even in some ways become a bit boring?

    The widespread interest in Witchcraft, Magic and the Occult in the 60s and 70s may have been sometimes salacious and sensational but because old conventions and moral orthodoxies, including the Churches, were somewhat stronger back then I think the Occult was by contrast seen as much more startling, exciting and ‘other’, much more forbidden and thus much more alluring and potent – whereas nowadays when there are few boundaries the rising tide of atheistic materialism and free-market consumerism seems to have even begun to leach the life out of the Occult. There somehow seems to be much less intensity and actual belief in it all than there used to be, particularly amongst the young.
    The postwar (1950s-1970s) occult explosion and widepread upsurge of interest may have been naive and often salacious but it seems to me to have been much more colourful, vivid and exciting than todays dreary New Age blandout or Goth/Black Metal snorefest – but maybe I’m just showing my age! I’d be interested to hear your thoughts on this subject
    I’m not talking about our deeper spirituality which hopefully matures with age, contemplation and experience, of course – more about the role of the Occult in wider culture, in the popular sense. I reckon it’s much harder on these young pups today and that finding authentic Occult wisdom was never more difficult, despite (or perhaps because of) the information-overload of the Internet. Whereas when I was growing up esoteric knowledge was less easily procured but all the more precious and valued for that.
    What do you think on the way things have gone David?

    All the Best,
    Hesselius

    • reply David Farrant ,

      Thanks for that Hesselius,

      Your questions are always profound, which is why enjoy answering them.

      I will deal with your questions as a main post tomorrow afternoon as I think you make important points which merit more than just a ‘few line’ reply.

      Besides, it will give me something else to talk about on a Sunday!

      For the moment,

      David

      • reply Columbine ,

        For David and Hesselius,

        Excellent comments, both. I personally think that the ‘witchcraft revival’ of post-war Britain was a reaction to the ‘old guard’ that was in place before WW2. It wasn’t only witchcraft that saw a revival; many people, with their newly-created wealth began to worship the cult of commercialism and church attendances tailed off. It was as if folks had realised that post-war life had much more to offer than the austerity of the 1920’s and 1930’s.

        I think that there was a revival of all things from the 1950’s onwards, and also some very new ones, e.g. rock and roll, higher disposable income, better food and health, labour-saving gadgets, employment – all these things went hand-in-hand with other aspects of life, and that included religion. The salacious tales of ‘witchcraft orgies’ and so on, merely lent a splash of colour to an already awakening social canvas.

        Columbine.

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